Watch 2017-09-08T23:54:41+00:00

Seven Short Films about Cuba: Watch Online

By | 6/December/2018|

In a new series, Alborada curates a selection of socially-conscious and radical short films focused on a specific Latin American country, all of which are freely available and can be watched here.

This new series focuses on short films from different Latin American countries to present a broad picture of the people, movements and struggles, past and present, that define each one. This article focuses on Cuba.

1) Si No Se Puede Bailar, Esta No Es Mi Revolución (Lillah Halla)

Cubans film themselves in their own homes dancing to the song that most encapsulates that moment of their lives. In the absence of audio, the songs play in the dancers’ minds. An intimate and revealing short film that benefits from its ‘Do It Yourself’ motif that anyone can follow.

2) El Abuelo de Macondo (Hugo Prado Villegas, Maíra Silva Conde and Vladimir Castillo)

The Grandfather of Macondo is almost 105 years old and still struts around town puffing on a cigar and telling stories. Much has happened in Cuba during his lifetime and he sees much more ahead.

3) Noval: Photographer of the Revolution (Orrin Luc)

Liborio Noval is a Cuban photographer

Six Short Films about Mexico: Watch Online

By | 15/November/2018|

In a new series, Alborada curates a selection of socially-conscious and radical short films focused on a specific Latin American country, all of which are freely available and can be watched here.

This new series focuses on short films from different Latin American countries to present a broad picture of the people, movements and struggles, past and present, that define each one. Our first stop is Mexico.

(Please feel free to leave your own recommendations in the comments section below.)

1) Connected Walls (Valeria Fernandez and Fidel Enriquez)

Nogales is, officially, two cities but in effect is one urban sprawl straddling the Mexico-US border. Locals do not refer to a border but rather ‘the line’. In addition to physical space, Teresa and Faith transcend social and cultural divides as well. As Faith describes her time on construction sites, being one woman among 700 men: ‘although I’ve not emigrated from one country to another, I’ve emigrated from one gender to an experience that is similar’.

2) We are Equal: Zapatista Women Speak (Chiapas Media Project / Promedios)

In this self-produced film, Zapatista women address historic patriarchy within their societies and how their liberation is a core tenet

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