Playlists 2017-09-08T23:53:20+00:00

2017 End of Year Musica Selection ♫

By | 20/December/2017|

A selection of 10 songs: eight from 2017 and two especially for the December holidays. Selected by the Alborada Soundsystem’s Ursula Parvex.

Listen to 8 of the 10 songs on our Youtube channel and the full selection on our Spotify channel. See here and below.

Songs:

1) ‘El Origen’ (Nicola Cruz Remix) by Rodrigo Gallardo (Chile) and Nicola Cruz (Ecuador)

2) ‘Giumbele’ by Nelda Pina y La Boa feat. Nidia Gongora (Colombia) – album: Volumen

3) ‘Receita Rapida’ by Anelis Assumpcao (Brazil) – album: Receita Rapida

4) ‘Anunciacao’ by Ubunto (Brazil) – album: Piva

5) ‘Yo Me Tomo El Ron’ by Chuito EL De Bayamon y Johnny el Bravo (Puerto Rico) – album: Musica Jibara para las Navidades

6) ‘Caldo Parao’ by Ondatropica (Colombia, United Kingdom) – album: Baile Bucanero

7) ‘No Fim’ – Thiago El Nino (Brazil) – album: A Rotina do Pombo

8) ‘Tu Luz’ – Lido Pimiento (Colombia, Canada) and Thornato (US) – album: Bennu

9) ‘Cuentos de anoche’ by Chico Mann (US) and Captain Planet (US) – album: Night Visions

10) ‘La Fiesta de Pilito’ by El Gran Combo de Puerto Rico (Puerto Rico) – album: 30th Anniversary

To listen to this and other Alborada playlists, click here.

2017 End of Year Musica Selection ♫

By | 20/December/2017|

A selection of 10 songs: eight from 2017 and two especially for the December holidays. Selected by the Alborada Soundsystem’s Ursula Parvex.

Listen to 8 of the 10 songs on our Youtube channel and the full selection on our Spotify channel. See here and below.

Songs:

1) ‘El Origen’ (Nicola Cruz Remix) by Rodrigo Gallardo (Chile) and Nicola Cruz (Ecuador)

2) ‘Giumbele’ by Nelda Pina y La Boa feat. Nidia Gongora (Colombia) – album: Volumen

3) ‘Receita Rapida’ by Anelis Assumpcao (Brazil) – album: Receita Rapida

4) ‘Anunciacao’ by Ubunto (Brazil) – album: Piva

5) ‘Yo Me Tomo El Ron’ by Chuito EL De Bayamon y Johnny el Bravo (Puerto Rico) – album: Musica Jibara para las Navidades

6) ‘Caldo Parao’ by Ondatropica (Colombia, United Kingdom) – album: Baile Bucanero

7) ‘No Fim’ – Thiago El Nino (Brazil) – album: A Rotina do Pombo

8) ‘Tu Luz’ – Lido Pimiento (Colombia, Canada) and Thornato (US) – album: Bennu

9) ‘Cuentos de anoche’ by Chico Mann (US) and Captain Planet (US) – album: Night Visions

10) ‘La Fiesta de Pilito’ by El Gran Combo de Puerto Rico (Puerto Rico) – album: 30th Anniversary

To listen to this and other Alborada playlists, click here.

Celebrating Violeta Parra: Five of her Best

By | 4/October/2017|

On the centenary of Violeta Parra’s birth, we select five songs by the legendary Chilean folk musician who continues to inspire musicians and social movements alike.

Through her music, the folk singer Violeta Parra championed social justice and political affirmation among her fellow Chileans, particularly the rural poor and working classes marginalised and repressed by ruling sectors whose interests directly contradicted the basic rights of the majority population. Having grown up in southern Chile’s impoverished countryside, Violeta’s seething outrage at the indignity and suffering she witnessed imposed upon her people was offset by the harmonious serenity of songs which brimmed with political agency. However, she suffered depression for many years and committed suicide in 1967 at the age of 49.

Even prior to her death, Violeta Parra was a huge influence across Latin America. Along with the Argentinian folk musician Atahualpa Yupanqui, she inspired the nueva canción movement which resituated traditional folklore towards socio-political goals, understanding that music was a far more effective tool for developing political consciousness in the popular sectors who often had little access to radio or television and endured high illiteracy rates. Musicians such as Mercedes Sosa, Victor Jara, Facundo Cabral and Silvio Rodríguez drew inspiration from Parra’s music and exported her ideas of human dignity and popular unity around the world. Today, musicians across Latin America and the world continue to reference her work and, more importantly, her galvanising message.

To celebrate the centenary of Violeta Parra’s birth on 4 October 1917, here are five of her greatest songs. You can listen to the playlist on our YouTube channel here: Feel free to add your own suggestions in the comments section below.

Soundtrack to the Struggle

By | 6/December/2016|

Contemporary Latin American women musicians are addressing pressing social issues through music.

¡Ay, qué manera de caer hacia arriba y de ser sempiterna, esta mujer!’ (‘Oh, the way this woman has of falling upwards and being eternal!’)

These are the opening lines to Pablo Neruda’s poem ‘Una Elegia para Cantar’ (An Elegy for Singing) in which he praises the virtues of Chilean singer, songwriter and artist, Violeta Parra. Parra’s exploration and popularisation of Chilean folk music was at the heart of the Latin American Nueva Canción movement of the 1960s and 70s. This radical period was defined musically by the fusion of folk-inspired instrumentation and lyrics advocating social and political change. Parallel movements such as Tropicália in Brazil and Nueva Trova in Cuba, which also arose at this time, created a platform for social and political dialogue. The contribution made by female artists played a central role in the development of these musical protest movements.

Through their deeply political lyricism and incorporation of African or Indigenous musical traditions, artists such as Gal Costa and Maria Bethânia in Brazil, and Mercedes Sosa in Argentina, contributed to the fight against injustice and oppression.

The legacy of these inspirational women continues to this day. Within the vast world of contemporary Latin American music, amongst the ever-growing range of styles and genres, there are powerful Latina voices channelling the spirit of the protest generation. In this musical selection, artistic genres range from Latino trap to cumbia through to Afro-Cuban jazz. Despite their musical diversity, they come together in building a new narrative for Latin American women.

Female solidarity, inequality, internationalism, racism and police brutality; a whole raft of issues are covered by these contemporary artists. In some cases, overt political messages are relinquished in favour of descriptions of the daily struggles. In other songs, the act of protest lies in the female artist’s defiance of traditional gender constraints that had previously limited their access to certain genres of music.

Hip-hop has a strong presence in this list. Flying in the face of the misogynistic and patriarchal undertones so often present in mainstream hip- hop, these artists are returning to the genre’s tradition as a platform for cultural resistance. Their rhymes draw attention to issues such as gender violence, lack of access to education and the struggle to make their voices heard within their own community.

When we put this music in the context of the urgent problems facing Latin America today – rising inequality, gender violence, poor education, environmental degradation and human rights abuses – the importance of protest music cannot be understated. Equally, neither can the important role Latin American women are playing in finding the solutions.

¡Arriba las Mujeres! Playlist

Listen to Ursula’s 16-track ¡Arriba las Mujeres! playlist on Spotify here and below, or on YouTube here and below. Ursula has written about six of the songs featured on the playlist below.

‘Poesía Venenosa’ by Rebeca Lane

Guatemalan feminist rapper Rebeca Lane’s socially conscious lyrics deal with the day-to-day realities of being a female hip-hop artist. In Lane’s view “hip-hop is a political movement”

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