Home2022-01-14T20:27:35+00:00

Your Support Needed: Alborada at The World Transformed Festival in Liverpool, UK

By |17/September/2022|

Can you help Alborada to take part in next week’s The World Transformed political education festival in Liverpool?

We’re delighted to return to The World Transformed (TWT) festival in Liverpool next week (24-27 September).

Following our successful seminar at TWT last year, we’ve been invited to return this year and run a seminar focused on the resurgence of the Latin American Left. We’ll be joined by some great speakers including María José Pizarro, a Colombian senator in the new progressive government of Gustavo Petro.

It is a time of optimism across Latin America, as Honduras, Chile and, for the first time ever, Colombia have recently elected leftwing governments, with Brazil looking well-placed to join them in October’s election. Alongside the defeat of a US/UK-backed coup in Bolivia, these new governments join several other countries in the region currently under progressive leadership. These spectacular triumphs provide important lessons for a British Left which has found itself on the ropes since the 2019 election.

We will also be providing interviews and talks to TWT’s festival TV channel, which will bring Latin America’s message of hope to a wide audience.

To do all this, we’re asking for your support to help us reach £250 to cover some of the costs of our participation at TWT. TWT provide a venue and cover some costs. In addition we plan to pay someone to film and edit the seminar which will go on our website. We’d also need to cover various other expenses associated with attending the festival.

We hope you will be able to make a donation, but if you can’t, you can support us by sharing this request and our event at TWT. Your support is greatly appreciated and if you are in Liverpool for the festival please do come and say hello.

Anyone donating more than £15 will receive a complimentary digital rental of documentaries from both of Alborada’s co-editors: Pablo Navarrete’s No Extradition and Nick MacWilliam’s Santiago Rising.

If we manage to surpass our £250 target all funds will go to supporting our work.

Click here to donate. Thank you for your support.

Your Support Needed: Alborada at The World Transformed Festival in Liverpool, UK

By |17/September/2022|

Can you help Alborada to take part in next week’s The World Transformed political education festival in Liverpool?

We’re delighted to return to The World Transformed (TWT) festival in Liverpool next week (24-27 September).

Following our successful seminar at TWT last year, we’ve been invited to return this year and run a seminar focused on the resurgence of the Latin American Left. We’ll be joined by some great speakers including María José Pizarro, a Colombian senator in the new progressive government of Gustavo Petro.

It is a time of optimism across Latin America, as Honduras, Chile and, for the first time ever, Colombia have recently elected leftwing governments, with Brazil looking well-placed to join them in October’s election. Alongside the defeat of a US/UK-backed coup in Bolivia, these new governments join several other countries in the region currently under progressive leadership. These spectacular triumphs provide important lessons for a British Left which has found itself on the ropes since the 2019 election.

We will also be providing interviews and talks to TWT’s festival TV channel, which will bring Latin America’s message of hope to a wide audience.

To do all this, we’re asking for your support to help us reach £250 to cover some of the costs of our participation at TWT. TWT provide a venue and cover some costs. In addition we plan to pay someone to film and edit the seminar which will go on our website. We’d also need to cover various other expenses associated with attending the festival.

We hope you will be able to make a donation, but if you can’t, you can support us by sharing this request and our event at TWT. Your support is greatly appreciated and if you are in Liverpool for the festival please do come and say hello.

Anyone donating more than £15 will receive a complimentary digital rental of documentaries from both of Alborada’s co-editors: Pablo Navarrete’s No Extradition and Nick MacWilliam’s Santiago Rising.

If we manage to surpass our £250 target all funds will go to supporting our work.

Click here to donate. Thank you for your support.

“Without Peace With The Planet, There Will Be No Peace Among Nations”

By |22/September/2022|

President Gustavo Petro’s historic speech at the United Nations General Assembly.

There is no total peace without social, economic and environmental justice. We are also at war with the planet. Without peace with the planet, there will be no peace among nations. Without social justice, there is no social peace.

I come from one of the three most beautiful countries on Earth.

There is an explosion of life there. Thousands of multicoloured species in the seas, in the skies, in the lands… I come from the land of yellow butterflies and magic. There in the mountains and valleys of all greens, not only do the abundant waters flow down, but also the torrents of blood. I come from a land of bloody beauty.

My country is not only beautiful: it is also violent.

How can beauty be conjugated with death? How can the biodiversity of life erupt with the dances of death and horror? Who is guilty of breaking the enchantment with terror? Who or what is responsible for drowning life in the routine decisions of wealth and interest? Who is leading us to destruction as a nation and as a people?

My country is beautiful because it has the Amazon jungle, the Chocó jungle, the waters, the Andes mountains and the oceans. There, in those forests, planetary oxygen is emanated and atmospheric CO2 is absorbed. One of these CO2 absorbing plants, among millions of species, is one of the most persecuted on earth. At any cost, its destruction is sought: it is an Amazonian plant, the coca plant, sacred plant of the Incas. [It is in] a paradoxical crossroads.

The jungle that tries to save us is, at the same time, destroyed. To destroy the coca plant, they spray poisons, glyphosate, in mass that runs through the waters, they arrest its growers and imprison them. For destroying or possessing the coca leaf, one million Latin Americans have been killed and two million African-Americans are imprisoned in North America. Destroy the plant that kills, they shout from the North, but the plant is but one more of the millions that perish when they unleash the fire on the jungle. Destroying the jungle, the Amazon, has become the slogan followed by states and businessmen. The cry of scientists baptising the rainforest as one of the great climatic pillars is unimportant.

For the world’s power relations, the jungle and its inhabitants are to blame for the plague that plagues them. The power relations are plagued by the addiction to money, to perpetuate themselves, to oil, to cocaine and to the hardest drugs to be able to anesthetise themselves more. Nothing is more hypocritical than the discourse to save the rainforest. The jungle is burning, gentlemen, while you make war and play with it. The rainforest, the climatic pillar of the world, disappears with all its life.

The great sponge that absorbs planetary CO2 evaporates. The saviour forest is seen in my country as the enemy to be defeated, as the weed to be extinguished.

Coca, and the peasants who grow it because

A New ‘Pink Tide’

By |21/September/2022|

Latin America is in the midst of a left-wing resurgence, a new ‘pink tide‘, following the defeat of a US/UK sponsored coup in Bolivia and some spectacular election victories.

References to a Latin American Left should come accompanied with an asterisk, as left-wing governments and movements attempting to transcend neoliberal capitalism – and in some cases capitalism itself – are ideologically diverse and not one homogenous bloc. However, broadly speaking, Latin America is in the midst of a left-wing resurgence, a new ‘pink tide‘, following the defeat of a US and UK sponsored coup in Bolivia and some spectacular election victories in countries such as Chile and most recently Colombia

What are the lessons, if any, of these victories for those in the UK seeking to resist and create alternatives to their own reactionary ruling political and media class?

Colombia offers an instructive starting point. In mid-June, a country known as the US’s enforcer in the region, whose elite have historically waged war on the country’s progressive forces, elected its first left-wing president since it became an independent republic in 1810. Gustavo Petro, a former left-wing guerrilla and mayor of Colombia’s capital, Bogotá, defied a sustained establishment campaign against him to storm to the presidency on a wave of dissatisfaction with the country’s rulers and hope for progressive change. If the left can win in Colombia, South America’s reactionary bulwark, then it can win anywhere.

A tipping point was reached when the security forces of right-wing president Ivan Duque brutally repressed an anti-government uprising that began in April last year:  40 protesters were reportedly killed. Colombia remains the country with the worst human rights record in the western hemisphere. Since the November 2016 signing of a peace agreement between the left-wing FARC guerrillas and the government, 320 former FARC combatants and more than 1,000 community activists have been murdered. It should surprise no one that the UK government provides the Colombian security forces with training and arms

On 7 August, Petro and his inspiring vice-president, the Afro-Colombian activist Francia Márquez, will take office with the gigantic task of facing down the country’s blood-drenched elite and opening a path for the construction of real peace and social justice. Key to their victory was the creation of a broad front of left and progressive forces that galvanised social movements on the frontline of the struggle for change. Márquez, in a speech at last year’s The World Transformed said that she was running for office

WATCH: Chile’s Constitutional Referendum Defeat: What Happened? (Alborada Online)

By |14/September/2022|

Our latest Alborada Online analyses the 4 September referendum result in Chile, in which 62% of voters rejected a new progressive constitution.

Watch the video recording of our event held on 21 June 2022 below or on our YouTube channel.

You can find more information about the speakers and the event, here.

Listen to the event on Spotify and elsewhere here.

To see the full list of our Alborada Online events click here.

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The Most Important Election in the Americas is in Brazil

By |7/September/2022|

Next month’s presidential election in polarised Brazil will have major consequences for Latin America and beyond.

Former Brazilian President Luíz Inácio Lula da Silva (known as Lula) runs about on stage at the Latin America Memorial in São Paulo. He was there on 22 August 22 2022, speaking at a book launch featuring photographs by Ricardo Stuckert about Lula’s trips around the world when he was the president of Brazil from 2003 to 2010.

Lula is a man with a great deal of energy. He recounts the story of when he was in Iran with his Foreign Minister Celso Amorim in 2010, trying to mediate and end the conflict imposed by the United States over Iran’s nuclear energy policy. Lula managed to secure a nuclear deal in 2010 that would have prevented the ongoing pressure campaign that Washington is conducting against Tehran. There was relief in the air. Then, Lula said, ‘Obama pissed outside the pot.’ According to Lula, then-US president Barack Obama did not accept the deal and crushed the hard work of the Brazilian leadership in bringing all sides to an agreement.

Lula’s story puts two important points on the table: he was able to build on Brazil’s role in Latin America by offering leadership in far-off Iran during his previous tenure as president, and he is not afraid of expressing his antipathy for the way the United States is scuttling the possibility of peace and progress across the world for its own narrow interests.

The book release took place during Lula’s campaign for president against the current incumbent – and deeply unpopular – president, Jair Bolsonaro. Lula is now in the lead in the polls ahead of the first round of Brazil’s presidential election to be held on 2 October.

Fernando Haddad, who ran against Bolsonaro in 2018 and lost after receiving less than 45 per cent of the vote, told me that this election remains ‘risky.’ The polls might show that Lula is in the lead, but Bolsonaro is known to play dirty politics to secure his victory. The far right in Brazil, like the far right in many other countries, is fierce in the way it contests for state power. Bolsonaro, Haddad said, is willing to lie openly, saying offensive things to the far right media and then when challenged about it by the mainstream media, he tends to feign ignorance. ‘Fake news’ seems to be Bolsonaro’s best defence each time he is attacked.

The left is far more sincere in its political discourse; leftists are unwilling to lie and eager to bring the issues of hunger and unemployment, social despair and social advancement to the centre of the political debate. But there is less interest in these issues and less noise about them in a media landscape that thrives on the theatrics of Bolsonaro and his followers. The old traditional right is as outflanked as the far right in Brazil, which is a space that is now commanded by Bolsonaro (the old traditional right, the men in dark suits who made decisions over

“Defeat Lawfare. Defend Cristina Fernández de Kirchner.”

By |2/September/2022|

The Progressive International statement on the persecution of Argentina’s Vice President Cristina Fernández de Kirchner.

We, members of the Council of the Progressive International, express our solidarity with the Vice-President of Argentina Cristina Fernández de Kirchner in view of the judicial and media persecution to which she is being subjected, with the clear objective of politically disqualifying her – the foremost leader of the Peronist movement – ahead of the 2023 presidential elections.

The anti-democratic rightwing of the region uses lawfare tactics to harass, persecute, and disqualify the main progressive leaders of the national and popular governments of Latin America. Direct military interventions and violent coups have been increasingly traded for legal warfare paired with corporate media collusion to attack political leaders who do not serve the interests of the ruling class and the neoliberal model.

The constant judicial persecution that Vice-President Fernández de Kirchner has endured puts the country’s democratic life at risk. That is the real objective of the lawfare we are seeing across Latin America today: the judicialisation of politics to attack and disqualify progressive leaders such as Manuel Zelaya, Rafael Correa, Fernando Lugo, Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva, Dilma Rousseff, Evo Morales, Álvaro García Linera, Jorge Glas and currently Cristina Fernández de Kirchner.

We, members of the Council of the Progressive International, express our deep solidarity with Cristina Fernández de Kirchner with the conviction that popular mobilisation will be vital to confront attacks on democratic processes, popular sovereignty and leaders of political projects of inclusion and social justice in a free, united and sovereign Patria Grande.

Signed,

Yanis Varoufakis MP (Greece)

Dr. Cornel West (United States)

Aruna Roy (India)

Baltasar Garzón (Spain)

Leïla Chaibi MEP (France)

Ertuğrul Kürkçü (Turkey)

Vijay Prashad (India)

Alicia Castro (Argentina)

Ahdaf Soueif (Egypt)

Renata Ávila (Guatemala)

Nikhil Dey (India)

Yara Hawari (Palestine)

Srečko Horvat (Croatia)

Scott Ludlam (Australia)

Nick Estes (United States)

Niki Ashton MP (Canada)

This declaration was previously published in the Progressive International and has been edited for style.

Alborada is a member of the Progressive International wire service.

Indestructible Podcast #14 – Chile: A New Constitution?

By |1/September/2022|

In the 14th episode of Indestructible Rodrigo interviews Chilean academic Jorge Saavedra Utman.

Indestructible: Latin America with Rodrigo Acuña is a podcast from Alborada bringing you monthly discussions with some of the most interesting voices working on and from Latin America.

In this 14th episode of Indestructible Podcast, Rodrigo speaks to speaks to media expert Jorge Saavedra Utman about the proposed progressive constitution which will be put to Chilean voters on 4 September possibly ending magna carta established under the Pinochet dictatorship.

The podcast is available on Spotify and other podcast streaming website

Facebook / Twitter / Instagram

Please consider supporting the podcast on Patreon.

::: Episode 14:

Chile: A New Constitution? With Jorge Saavedra.

Listen to episode 13 on Audioboom and a range of other podcast streaming websites

Click here to go to the Indestructible homepage.

Presented by Alborada contributing editor Rodrigo Acuña

Produced and edited by Pablo Navarrete

Music by Chylez Productions.

Please consider supporting the podcast on Patreon.

Get in touch with the podcast: info [at] alborada [dot] net

 

WATCH: Jeremy Corbyn’s Message of Support for Chile’s New Constitution

By |19/August/2022|

UK Member of Parliament Jeremy Corbyn has a message ahead of Chile’s 4 September constitutional referendum.

Watch the video here and below. Transcript in English and Spanish below.

Join the global movement in support of Chile’s new constitution: https://act.progressive.international/newchile/

⇛ Subscribe to Alborada on YouTube here.

Support our work here.

**To watch the video with Spanish subtitles click on ‘Spanish’ in the ‘Settings’ section of the video on YouTube.**

 

 

ENGLISH TRANSCRIPT:

Sunday 4th of September is a very, very important day in the history of Chile. It’s an opportunity to change course. It’s an opportunity for a new democratic constitution. An opportunity to empower people and give them new rights, which is what the new constitution offers. My support is for the new constitution. Vote to approve it.

TRANSCRIPCIÓN EN ESPAÑOL:

El domingo 4 de septiembre es un día muy, muy importante en la historia de Chile. Es una oportunidad para cambiar de rumbo. Es una oportunidad para aprobar una nueva constitución democrática. Una oportunidad para empoderar a la gente y darles nuevos derechos, que es lo que ofrece la nueva constitución. Mi apoyo es para la nueva constitución. Vota apruebo.

Indestructible Podcast #13 – Brazil’s 2022 Presidential Election

By |23/July/2022|

In the 13th episode of Indestructible Rodrigo interviews Brazilian journalist Nathalia Urban.

Indestructible: Latin America with Rodrigo Acuña is a podcast from Alborada bringing you monthly discussions with some of the most interesting voices working on and from Latin America.

In this 13th episode of Indestructible Podcast, Rodrigo speaks to speaks to Nathália Urban about Brazil’s upcoming 2022 presidential elections. Nathália is a Brazilian journalist who writes for Brazil Wire, Brasil247 and Jacobin Brasil amongst others.

The podcast is available on Spotify and other podcast streaming websites.

Facebook / Twitter / Instagram

Please consider supporting the podcast on Patreon.

::: Episode 13:

Brazil’s 2022 Presidential Election. With Nathalia Urban.

Listen to episode 13 on Audioboom and a range of other podcast streaming websites

Click here to go to the Indestructible homepage.

Presented by Alborada contributing editor Rodrigo Acuña

Produced and edited by Pablo Navarrete

Music by Chylez Productions.

Please consider supporting the podcast on Patreon.

Get in touch with the podcast: info [at] alborada [dot] net

How Colombian Women Decriminalised Abortion

By |20/July/2022|

While abortion rights across the globe are under attack — most recently in the United States — the successful feminist mobilisation in a deeply conservative country like Colombia should give reason for hope.

The ruling by the Constitutional Court to decriminalise abortion was facilitated by creative action in the judiciary, the branch of power most receptive to change. However, what was essential was an extensive feminist mobilisation, which knew how to find loopholes in the population’s conservatism.

Progressive International Editorial Note: Following the tragic news of the rollback of reproductive rights in the United States, we’ve looked to our Wire partners for coverage of, and lessons from, abortion right victories around the world. Earlier this year Mexico’s Supreme Court ruled to decriminalize abortion, this piece from Wire partner Dissent shows that, in addition to fighting the legal battles, it is also necessary to revive cross-border solidarity networks and deepen a transnational reproductive justice movement that centres bodily autonomy and diverse, dignified options for pregnant people. The following piece on Colombia’s supreme court ruling to decriminalise abortion, written for a Brazilian audience, is another such contribution.

By five votes to four, the (Colombian) Constitutional Court ruled that having an abortion is no longer a crime, up until the 24th week of gestation. This represents a great triumph for the feminist movement, achieved with persistence and political skill. The last step – which led to the victory – was a lawsuit by the group Causa Justa (Just Causa), challenging in court the constitutionality of the prohibition to terminate a pregnancy.

In 2006, the court had already decided to decriminalise abortion in situations where the life or the health (physical or mental) of the woman was in danger, when the pregnancy was the result of rape or incest or when a foetal malformation made life outside the womb non-viable. But Causa Justa argued, more recently, that the barriers and criminalisation of other cases caused so many problems for women that they were often denied their rights – especially those in rural areas, the poorest, and those living in regions of armed conflict. In Colombia, about 400 women were sentenced each year for the interruption of pregnancy.

Like Brazil, Colombia is a country of strong Conservative and Catholic traditions. Although 82 per cent of the population supports abortion in specific cases, only 26 per cent support it unrestrictedly. Therefore, already in 2006, Mónica Roa – an important Colombian lawyer for the cause – realised that the easiest way to win the right to abortion would not be through the congress, but through the courts. A remarkable article in El País tells the story: Mónica was an important player in the first stage to grant the right to abortion in special situations. Another activist, professor Florence Thomas, greatly influenced the complete decriminalisation approved recently. She says that the change in mentality is recent: ‘People used to leave my lectures when I started to talk about abortion.’ Her role as a professor at the National University, and especially as a leader in the Mesa

Colombia’s Left Turn: A New Chapter?

By |2/July/2022|

Colombia’s first leftwing president-elect, Gustavo Petro, is riding a wave of hope but will face intense challenges in trying to advance a progressive agenda that the country sorely needs.

In front of thousands of jubilant supporters packed into Bogota’s Movistar Arena, it was Francia Márquez, the newly elected vice-president, who gave the first victory speech.

‘Thank you for believing it possible to change the history of Colombia,’ she said to deafening cheers. Just a couple of hours earlier, on the evening of Sunday 19 June 2022 – a date that looks set to resonate in Colombian history – the election win of Márquez and the country’s next president, Gustavo Petro, had been confirmed. Their Historic Pact coalition crossed the 50 per cent share of votes needed to defeat entrepreneur Rodolfo Hernández and consign his bizarrely erratic candidacy to memory.

‘Greetings to the women of Colombia, to all my sisters,’ Márquez announced. ‘I want to send greetings to the Colombian youth who wore the t-shirts. To the children who were joyfully present in this dream. To the teachers and workers. To the disabled community, who were also with us. To the Indigenous people, who stood firm. To the peasant community. To my people, the Afro-Colombian, Raizal and Palenquero community!’

As Colombia’s first black woman vice-president paid tribute to the diverse social groups long excluded – often violently – from political and economic participation, the excitement rose. With celebrations underway in streets and plazas across the country, Márquez encapsulated in just a few words the government-elect’s representational character. Her message was clear: this is a government of and for the people. As the daughter of miners from one of Colombia’s many marginalised zones now addressed the country from the second-highest office in the land, few could disagree.

Márquez’s electoral slogan ‘vivir sabroso’ – loosely translated as ‘to live the fun times’ – was a masterstroke, far removed from the negative miseria-type discourse often used to describe life on the peripheries. Her campaign celebrated Colombians’ love of a good time, aligned with a political programme that confronted material hardship. The offer appeared to resonate with working people – the Historic Pact took around 80 per cent of the vote in underdeveloped and conflict-ravaged departments such as Chocó, Nariño and Márquez’s homeland of Cauca, statistically the most violent region in the country.

Márquez was followed onstage by the president-elect. ‘We are a demonstration that peace is possible in Colombia,’ Petro told the crowd, ‘that dreams can come true, dreams of justice, dreams of freedom.’ He pledged to fight inequality and climate change, to strengthen peace and to listen to all Colombians, including political opponents, to whom his door would always be open.

A third speaker, the only other person to take the microphone, emphasised the new direction that Petro and Márquez offer. Jenny Medina, a working-class woman from Bogota, held aloft a photo of her son, Dilan Cruz, who was killed, aged 18, by riot police during protests in November 2019. Although speaking to Petro directly, her words were addressed

WATCH: How the Left Won Colombia

By |25/June/2022|

Alborada co-editor Pablo speaks to the UK’s Not the Andrew Marr Show about Gustavo Petro’s victory in Colombia.

Watch the video interview here or below.

 

 

 

Photography

Kiev, 26 May 2018

By |27/May/2018|

Liverpool supporters attending the Champions League final carry banners in solidarity with Brazilian former president Lula Da Silva and Catalan political prisoners. Polls show that if Lula ran in this year’s presidential election, he would win by a landslide and restore the Workers’ Party to government.

Video

Chile’s Student Uprising (Documentary)

By |2/April/2020|

Watch this documentary on the student protest movement in Chile in 2011 (Director Roberto Navarrete, 35 mins, Alborada Films, 2014).

Mass student protests took place in Chile between 2011 and 2013 demanding a free and state-funded education system and radical change in society. The documentary puts these protests in their historical context of widespread dissatisfaction with the economic model put in place under the Pinochet dictatorship (1973-1990), but that still remains largely in place.

The film’s director travelled to Chile between 2011 and 2013 to speak to then student leaders (now Members of Congress) such as Camila Vallejo and Giorgio Jackson, and also to other students, to explore why their protests had caused such effect in Chile and inspired others in the country and beyond.

“Roberto Navarrete’s is the most complete and compelling visual account of Chile’s student uprising to date. All the lessons from Patricio Guzmán’s path-breaking style of documenting in film are there: poetic visuals, an engaged narrative, the focus on personal feelings and stories combined with subtle and accessible analysis, plus a sense of the tragic tempered by the optimism of the will. Navarrete adds to it the passion and distance of the exile’s gaze, and a Latin American Beckettian flare for celebration while thinking. This is a must see for all those interested in the current sway of global rebellions that show us all the shape of things to come. Superb!”

Dr Oscar Guardiola-Rivera, Professor in Law, Birbeck, University of London and author of ‘Story of a Death Foretold: The Coup Against Salvador Allende, September 11th, 1973’

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Video

Chile’s Student Uprising (Documentary)

By |2/April/2020|

Watch this documentary on the student protest movement in Chile in 2011 (Director Roberto Navarrete, 35 mins, Alborada Films, 2014).

Mass student protests took place in Chile between 2011 and 2013 demanding a free and state-funded education system and radical change in society. The documentary puts these protests in their historical context of widespread dissatisfaction with the economic model put in place under the Pinochet dictatorship (1973-1990), but that still remains largely in place.

The film’s director travelled to Chile between 2011 and 2013 to speak to then student leaders (now Members of Congress) such as Camila Vallejo and Giorgio Jackson, and also to other students, to explore why their protests had caused such effect in Chile and inspired others in the country and beyond.

“Roberto Navarrete’s is the most complete and compelling visual account of Chile’s student uprising to date. All the lessons from Patricio Guzmán’s path-breaking style of documenting in film are there: poetic visuals, an engaged narrative, the focus on personal feelings and stories combined with subtle and accessible analysis, plus a sense of the tragic tempered by the optimism of the will. Navarrete adds to it the passion and distance of the exile’s gaze, and a Latin American Beckettian flare for celebration while thinking. This is a must see for all those interested in the current sway of global rebellions that show us all the shape of things to come. Superb!”

Dr Oscar Guardiola-Rivera, Professor in Law, Birbeck, University of London and author of ‘Story of a Death Foretold: The Coup Against Salvador Allende, September 11th, 1973’

Chile’s Student Uprising (Documentary)

By |2/April/2020|

Watch this documentary on the student protest movement in Chile in 2011 (Director Roberto Navarrete, 35 mins, Alborada Films, 2014).

Mass student protests took place in Chile between 2011 and 2013 demanding a free and state-funded education system and radical change in society. The documentary puts these protests in their historical context of widespread dissatisfaction with the economic model put in place under the Pinochet dictatorship (1973-1990), but that still remains largely in place.

The film’s director travelled to Chile between 2011 and 2013 to speak to then student leaders (now Members of Congress) such as Camila Vallejo and Giorgio Jackson, and also to other students, to explore why their protests had caused such effect in Chile and inspired others in the country and beyond.

“Roberto Navarrete’s is the most complete and compelling visual account of Chile’s student uprising to date. All the lessons from Patricio Guzmán’s path-breaking style of documenting in film are there: poetic visuals, an engaged narrative, the focus on personal feelings and stories combined with subtle and accessible analysis, plus a sense of the tragic tempered by the optimism of the will. Navarrete adds to it the passion and distance of the exile’s gaze, and a Latin American Beckettian flare for celebration while thinking. This is a must see for all those interested in the current sway of global rebellions that show us all the shape of things to come. Superb!”

Dr Oscar Guardiola-Rivera, Professor in Law, Birbeck, University of London and author of ‘Story of a Death Foretold: The Coup Against Salvador Allende, September 11th, 1973’